Curriculum – 8th Grade

DOMAIN  ARCHDIOCESAN EXPECTATIONS
We Believe Scripture has great meaning for life today
Articulate how the Bible was inspired by God and illustrate the many different literary styles found within the Bible
Use Scripture for prayer and liturgy
Transfer ideas from Scripture to daily life
The student will demonstrate an understanding of the history of the Church
Diagram the major historical events of the Church
Defend how the most current teachings of the Church were set out during the most recent council gathering – Vatican Council II
Justify why knowledge of the history of the Church is essential to a proper understanding of the faith
Discuss the impact of the history of the Church in the United States
Argue how tradition is ongoing and yet evolving
Characterize the lives of modern saints
The doctrine and dogma of the church are found in the Creedal statements
Explain how there is only one true God who is revealed as three distinct persons: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit
Justify how Jesus is Christ, the Messiah, the anointed one sent by God
Demonstrate how the Resurrection is God’s victory over sin and death and a source of life
Explain why Jesus’ passion, death, resurrection, and glorification is called the Paschal Mystery
The Trinity is revealed to all people in the person, word, and works of Jesus
Argue why, by the grace of Baptism, each person is called to share in the life of the Blessed Trinity here on earth and after death in eternal life
Defend why God created the world to show His glory
Deduce why the Incarnation is the mystery of the union of the divine and human natures in the person of Jesus, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity
Explain how, through the power of the Holy Spirit, God gave the world Jesus through Mary
We Worship Sacraments are important moments in the life of the community, especially the centrality of the Eucharist
Explain how the Sacraments are actions of the risen Christ acting through His Church to love, heal, and call each person to change
Express how, through the Sacrament of Baptism, each person is called to serve, witness, and proclaim the Good News
Debate how the Eucharist, that was instituted by Christ at the Last Supper, is the real presence of Christ among the faithful
The Eucharistic Liturgy (the Mass) is the communal celebration of the Paschal Mystery in which each person is called to full and active participation
Discuss how the Church gathers at the Eucharistic Liturgy to celebrate the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus
Justify why the Eucharistic Liturgy is the central prayer of the Catholic community
Argue for the real presence of Christ in the bread and wine offered at the Eucharistic Liturgy
Compare and contrast the liturgical seasons, feasts, and solemnities of the Church year
Compare and contrast the liturgical ministries (acolyte, lector, Eucharistic minister, greeter…)
Compare and contrast the two main parts of the Eucharistic celebration, the Liturgy of the Word, the Liturgy of the Eucharist, as well as two smaller rites, the Introductory Rite and the Concluding Rite
Justify The importance of song, silence, response, gesture, and movement in the Eucharistic Liturgy
Explain how Christ is present in the person of the minister, in the Eucharistic elements, in the Word, and in the gathered assembly
Describe and defend why the primary liturgical symbols are the altar, the ambo, the assembly, the presider’s chair, and the baptismal font
Defend the need for ritual
Evaluate one’s responsibility to fully and actively participate in the Eucharistic Liturgy
Compare and contrast the liturgical seasons and how the scripture and environment reflect the season
Articulate how the lectionary contains the readings for the three-year cycle of the Sunday Eucharistic Liturgy
Explain the importance of environment and art and how it relates to liturgical seasons and enhances worship
Explain the seasons of the Church year: Advent/Christmas, Lent/Easter, and Ordinary Time
Determine how the Eucharistic Liturgy prepares the faithful for how to be in the world – a people of welcome, service, and prayer
We Pray Catholic prayer and traditions are an important aspect of the life of the church
Explain the need to show our appreciation for the Word of God by attentive listening and responding to it in life
Defend the need for active and conscious participation in liturgy and other prayer experiences
Experience all forms of prayer: formal, informal, spontaneous, reflective, personal, Jesus prayer, music and movement, guided meditation, and communal
Experience community prayer by praying in a group, attending prayer services or liturgies, and visiting the church
Locate and use a variety of liturgical planning resources for liturgies and other prayer experiences
Compose prayers for specific events, celebrations, and prayer services
Learn the responses of the liturgy as prayer
Explain why prayer is central in a Catholic Christian life, particularly in celebration of the liturgy
Defend how the Psalms, which are prayers Jesus prayed while on earth, remain an important part of Catholic worship today
Articulate the practical role of prayer in sustaining a God-centered life
Justify how each person develops a relationship with God through personal prayer
Recite and explain the traditional prayers of the Church: Sign of the Cross, Our Father, Hail Mary, Grace before Meals, Doxology (Glory to the Father…), Act of Contrition, Apostles Creed, and Nicene Creed
Acknowledge and show appreciation for the traditional prayers of the Church: the Rosary, Prayer of St. Francis, Acts of Faith, Hope, & Love, Prayer of the Holy Spirit, Hail Holy Queen, Psalm 23, and Stations of the Cross
We Live Moral teachings give individuals the ability to make good moral decisions and to act in a responsible, Christian manner
Explain how moral values come from the teachings of Jesus
Describe the communal aspect of sin
Prove how the Ten Commandments, Jesus’ Great Commandment of Love, the Beatitudes, and Jesus’ teachings are the foundation to be used in the process of making good, moral decisions
Assess how Christian values help each person make social, economic, and political choices that build the kingdom of God
The Catholic Social Teachings can be applied to personal and societal situations
Describe how Jesus faced prejudice during His life on earth and defend His response as model for Christians today
Demonstrate how Jesus models love, respect, and reverence for human life
Examine the importance of participating in society and contributing to the common good, and defend the need to advance the common good in society
Compare and contrast how the Church has addressed social justice issues and how more needs to be done
Justify why, as Christians, each person is called to put the poor first
Communicate why the Beatitudes are a blueprint for a Christian life
Dramatize what it means to be a sign of contradiction to society’s values
Explain how, by virtue of Baptism and Confirmation, every Christian is called to service and that this call is fulfilled through a variety of lifestyles and ministries
Demonstrate how being a Christian influences our values and priorities
Document the underlying issues of labor disputes and legislation in place to protect workers
Defend the need to be committed to world peace and how to work for it
Show how a consumer culture impacts each person and the earth and how we can use our personal talents to care for the earth
We Are God’s Family Each person is drawn to God who, in creating them, has placed a desire for happiness in their hearts
Describe how God calls each person by name
Articulate and examine reasons for believing in God
The Church is the People of God, the Body of Christ, and the Community of Faith
Explain the history, work, and role of religious orders and the call to religious life today
Demonstrate how, through baptism, each person is called to be active participants in the community of faith
Articulate how the Catholic Church is a global community
Show how the heritage of various cultures enrich the experience and tradition of the Church
Express how each Christian, single, married, cleric, or religious, is called by Baptism to follow Christ and minister to others
Show how lay women and men contribute to their faith community through their parish community, as well as their daily witness to Gospel values
Explain how ordained priesthood, diaconate, and religious life are specific responses to the Baptismal call to minister in a special way to God’s people
The church expresses basic principles of Catholic teaching on the family
Describe how all family members develop in mind, body, and spirit through communication
Defend how life within the Catholic Christian family is the responsibility of each member
Explain the need for respect of the reproductive function of the human body
Explain the nature and importance of sexuality as a divine gift, a fundamental component of personality, and an enrichment of the whole person – body, emotions, soul
Justify how chastity is a virtue that develops a person’s authentic maturity and makes him or her capable of guiding the sexual instinct in the service of love and integrating it into his or her psychological and spiritual development
Explain the human and Christian values that sexuality is intended to express
Defend the need to respect the moral norms regarding sexuality that are taught by the Church
Justify why chastity is a virtue that develops a person’a authentic maturity and makes him or her capable of guiding the sexual instinct in the service of love and integrating it into his or her psychological and spiritual development
Examine the human and Christian values that sexuality is intended to express
Identify the moral norms regarding sexuality that are taught by the Church
DOMAIN  ARCHDIOCESAN EXPECTATIONS
Reading Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text
Using appropriate text, determine the theme(s) of a text and analyze its development over the course of a text
Analyze how specific word choices and sentence structures contribute to meaning and tone
Analyze how literary devices are used to develop setting, reveal character, advance the plot, and contribute to meaning
Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors
Explain how themes reflect historical and/or cultural contexts
Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently
Compare and contrast information presented in different mediums and analyze how the techniques unique to each medium contribute to meaning in literary and informational texts
Read and comprehend informational text independently and proficiently
Explain the central/main idea(s) of an informational text and analyze its development over the course of a text
Analyze how an author’s choice concerning a text’s form or overall structure contributes to meaning
Identify and explain the author’s use of symbols in literature and their effect on the overall meaning of a story or character development
Read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions of the human experience (i.e. moral, philosophical, ethical, aesthetic)
Participate as knowledgeable, reflective, and creative members of a variety of literacy communities
Establish a personal connection within various forms of literature in regards to personal faith, family, and community
Analyze and interpret characters’ motivations and roles in connection to real-world situations and people or groups
Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader create dramatic irony
Understand how literature serves as a vehicle through which different perspectives of the human experience can add valuable insight and knowledge
Writing Conduct research to answer a question (including self-generated question)
a. gather relevant, credible sources, print and digital
b. integrate information using a standard citation system
c. gather relevant information from multiple print/digital sources, using serch terms effectively
d. assess the credibility and accuracy of each source
e. quote/paraphrase the data and conclusions of others, avoiding plagiarism and following standard format for citation
Use the writing process to produce clear/coherent writing in which:
a. development/organization/style/voice are appropriate to task/purpose/audience
b. topics are introduced and a clear focus throughout the text is evident
Develop narratives, including poems, about real/imagined expereinces that establish/maintain a consistent point of view and include:
a. clearly identified characters
b. well-structured event sequences
c. narrative techniques
d. relevant descriptive details
Develop informative/explanatory writing to:
a. examine a topic with relevant facts, examples, and details
b. establish relationships between ideas/supporting evidence
Develop argumentative writing by:
a. introducing and supporting a claim with clear reasons and relevant evidence
b. acknowledging counterclaims
c. establishing relationships among claims, counterclaims, and supporting evidence
Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience
a. introduce the topic/maintain focus throughtout the text
b. choose precise language and make symetrical choices appropriate for style, task, and audience
Intrdouce the topic, maintain a clear focus throughout the text, provide a conclusion that follows from the text; add or delete content and change organization to achieve one’s purpose
Use a variety of appropriate transitions to clarify relationships, connect ideas and claims, and signal time shifts
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce/publish writing, present the relationships between information and ideas effciently, and interact/collaborate with others
Language Demonstrate a command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage:
a. explain the verbs in general and their function in particular sentences
b. form and use verbs in the active/passive tense
c. form and use verbs in the indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive mood
d. recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood
e. use punctuation to indicate a pause/break
f. use an ellipse to indicate an omission
Speaking & Listening Respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas
Acknowledge new information expressed by others, including those presented in diverse media and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views in light of evidence presented
Speak audibly and to the point using conventions of language as appropriate to task, purpose, and audience when presenting, including appropriate volume, clear articulation, and accurate pronounciation at an understandable pace
Make consistent eye contact with a range of listeners when speaking, using effective gestures to communicate a clear viewpoint and engage listeners
Plan and deliver appropriate presentations based on the task, audience, and purpose integrating multimedia into presentations to clarlify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest
Effectively participate in Socratic seminars including reading, note-taking, and question planning
MATH (PRE-ALGEBRA)
DOMAIN  ARCHDIOCESAN EXPECTATIONS
Number Sense & Operations Explore the Real Number System
Generate equivalent representations of rational numbers, including converting decimals which repeat into fractions and fractions into repreating decimals
Estimate the value and compare the size of irrational numbers and approximate their locations on a number line
Expressions, Equations, & Inequalities Work with radicals and integer exponents
Know and apply the properties of integer exponents to generate equivalent expressions
Investigate concepts of square and cube roots
a. Solve equations of the form x² = p and x³ = p, where p is a positive rational number
b. Evaluate square roots of perfect squares less than or equal to 625 and cube roots of perfect cubes less than or equal to 1000
c. Recognize that square roots of non-perfect squares are irrational
Express very large and very small quantities in scientific notation and approximate how many times the larger one is than the other
Use scientific notation to solve problems
a. Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both decimal and scientific notation are used
b. Use scientific notation and choose units of appropriate size for measurements of very large or very small quantities
Understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations
Graph proportional relationships
a. Compare two different proportional relationships
b. Interpret and draw conclusions of the unit rate as slope
Apply concepts of slope and y-intercept to graphs, equations, and proportional relationships
a. Explain why the slope (m) is the same between any two distinct points on a non-vertical line in the Cartesian coordinate plane
b. Derive the equation y=mx for a line through the origin and the equation y=mx + b for a line intercepting the vertical axis at b
Write linear equations in point-slope form { y- y₁ = m(x – x₁) } and standard form { ax + by = c } using points and slope in the Cartesian coordinate plane
a. Find slope using the slope formula as change in y over change in x
Analyze and solve linear equations and inequalities and pairs of simultaneous linear equations
Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable
a. Create and identify linear equations with one solution, infinitely many solutions, or no solutions
b. Apply linear equations and inequalities with rational number coefficients, including equations and inequalities whose solutions require expanding expressions using the distributive property and combining like terms
Identify parallel and perpendicular lines in the Cartesian coordinate plane by assessing their slopes
Analyze and solve systems of linear equations
a. Graph systems of linear equations and recognize the intersection as the solution of the system
b. Explain why solution(s) to a system of two linear equations in two variables correspond to point(s) of intersection of the graphs
c. Explain why systems of linear equations can have one solution, no solution, or infinitely many solutions
d. Solve systems of two linear equations
Geometry & Measurement Understand congruence and similarity using physical models, transparencies, or geometry software
Verify experimentally the congruence properties of rigid transformations
a. Verify that angle measure, betweeness, collinearity, and distance are preserved under rigid transformations
b. Investigate if orientation is preserved under rigid transformations
Understand that two-dimensional figures are congruent if a series of rigid transformations can be performed to map the pre-image to the image
a. Describe a possible sequence of rigid transformations between two congruent figures
Describe the effect of dilations, translations, rotations, and reflections on two-dimensional figures using coordinates
Understand that two-dimensional figures are similar if a series of transformations (rotations, reflections, translations, and dilations) can be performed to map the pre-image to the image
a. Describe a possible sequence of transformations between two similar figures
Explore angle relationships and establish informal arguments
a. Derive the sum of the interior angles of a triangle
b. Explore the relationship between the interior and exterior angles of a triangle
c. Construct and explore the angles created when parallel lines are cut by a transversal
d. Use the properties of similar figures to solve problems
Understand and apply the Pythagorean Theorem
Use models to demonstrate a proof of the Pythagorean Theorem and its converse
Use the Pythagorean Theorem to determine unknown side lengths in right triangles in problems in two- and three-dimensional contexts
Use the Pythagorean Theorem to find the distance between points in a Cartesian coordinate system
Solve problems involving volume of cones and spheres
Solve problems involving surface area and volume
a. Understand the concept of surface area and find surface area of cones
b. Understand the concepts of volume and find the volume of cones and spheres
Data Analysis, Statistics, & Probability Investigate patterns of association in bivariate data
Construct and interpret scatter plots of bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities
Generate and use a trend line for bivariate data, and informally assess the fit of the line
Interpret the parameters of a linear model of bivariate measurement data to solve problems
Understand the patterns of association in bivariate categorical data displayed in a two-way table
a. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects
b. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables
Functions Define, evaluate, and compare functions
Explore the concept of functions (the use of function notation is not required)
a. Understand that a function assigns to each input exactly one output
b. Determine if a relation is a function
c. Graph a function
Compare characteristics of two functions each represented in a different way
Investigate the differences between linear and nonlinear functions
a. Interpret the equation y = mx + b as defining a linear function, whose parameters are the slope (m) and the y-intercept (b)
b. Recognize that the graph of a linear function has a constant rate of change
c. Give examples of nonlinear functions
Use functions to model relationships between quantities
Use functions to model linear relationships between quantities
a. Explain the parameters of a linear function based on the context of a problem
b. Determine the parameters of a linear function
c. Determine the x-intercept of a linear function
Describe the functional relationship between two quantities from a graph or a verbal description
MATH (ALGEBRA)
Number & Quantity Extend and use properties of rational exponents
Explain how the meaning of rational exponents extends from the properties of integer exponents
Rewrite expressions involving radicals and rational exponents using the properties of exponents. Limit to rational exponents with a numerator of 1
Use units to solve problems
Use units of measure as a way to understand and solve problems involving quantities. a) Identity, label, and use appropriate units of measure within a problem. b) Convert units and rates. c) Use units within problems. d) Choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays
Define and use appropriate quantities for representing a given context or problem
Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities
Seeing Structure in Expressions Interpret and use structure
Interpret the contextual meaning of individual terms or factors from a given problem that utilizes formulas or expressions
Analyze the structure of polynomials to create equivalent expressions or equations
Choose and produce equivalent forms of a quadratic expression or equations to reveal and explain properties. a) Find the zeros of a quadratic function by rewriting it in factored form. b) Find the maximum or minimum value of a quadratic function by completing the square
Creating Equations Create equations that describe linear, quadratic, and exponential relationships
Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to model and/or solve problems
Create and graph linear, quadratic, and exponential equations in two variables
Represent constraints by equations or inequalities and by systems of equations or inequalities, and interpret the data points as a solution or non-solution in a modeling context
Solve literal equations and formulas for a specified variable that highlights a quantity of interest
Reasoning with Equations & Inequalities Understand solving equations as a process, and solve equations and inequalities in one variable
Explain how each step taken when solving an equation or inequality in one variable creates an equivalent equation or inequality that has the same solution(s) as the original
Solve problems involving quadratic equations. a) Use the method of completing the square to create an equivalent quadratic equation. b) Derive the quadratic formula. c) Analyze different methods of solving quadratic equations
Solve systems of equations
Solve a system of linear equations algebraically and/or graphically
Solve a system consisting of a linear equation and a quadratic equation algebraically and/or graphically
Justify that the technique of linear combination produces an equivalent system of equations
Represent and solve linear and exponential equations and inequalities graphically
Explain that the graph of an equation in two variables is the set of all its solutions plotted in the Cartesian coordinate plane
Graph the solution to a linear inequality in two variables
Solve problems involving a system of linear inequalities
Arithmatic with Polynomials & Rational Expressions Perform operations on polynomials
Add, subtract, and multiply polynomials and understand that polynomials follow the same general rules of arithmetic and are closed under these operations
Divide polynomials by monomials
Interpreting Functions Understand the concept of a function and use function notation
Understand that a function from one set (domain) to another set (range) assigns to each element of the domain exactly one element of the range. a) Represent a function using function notation. b) Understand that the graph of a function labeled 𝑓 is the set of all ordered pairs (𝑥, y) that satisfy the equation 𝑦=f (𝑥)
Use function notation to evaluate functions for inputs in their domains, and interpret statements that use function notation in terms of a context
Interpret linear, quadratic, and exponential functions in terms of the context
Using tables, graphs, and verbal descriptions, interpret key characteristics of a function that models the relationship between two quantities
Relate the domain and range of a function to its graph and, where applicable, to the quantitative relationship it describes
Determine the average rate of change of a function over a specified interval and interpret the meaning
Interpret the parameters of a linear or exponential function in terms of the context
Analyze linear, quadratic, and exponential functions using different representations
Graph functions expressed symbolically and identify and interpret key features of the graph
Translate between different but equivalent forms of a function to reveal and explain properties of the function and interpret these in terms of a context
Compare the properties of two functions given different representations
Building Functions Build new functions from existing functions (linear, quadratic, and exponential)
Analyze the effect of translations and scale changes on functions
Linear, Quadratic, & Exponential Models Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models and solve problems
Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear or exponential functions. a) Determine that linear functions change by equal differences over equal intervals. b) Recognize exponential situations in which a quantity grows or decays by a constant percent rate per unit interval
Describe, using graphs and tables, that a quantity increasing exponentially eventually exceeds a quantity increasing linearly or quadratically
Construct linear, quadratic, and exponential equations given graphs, verbal descriptions, or tables
Use arithmetic and geometric sequences
Write arithmetic and geometric sequences in recursive and explicit forms, and use them to model situations and translate between the two forms
Recognize that sequences are functions, sometimes defined recursively, whose domain is a subset of the set of integers
Find the terms of sequences given an explicit or recursive formula
Data & Statistics Summarize, represent, and interpret data
Analyze and interpret graphical displays of data
Use statistics appropriate to the shape of the data distribution to compare center and spread of two or more different data sets
Interpret differences in shape, center, and spreads in the context of the data sets, accounting for possible effects of outliers
Summarize data in two-way frequency tables
a. Interpret relative frequencies in the context of the data
b. Recognize possible associations and trends in the data
Construct a scatter plot of bivariate quantitative data describing how the variables are related; determine and use a function that models the relationship
a. Construct a linear function to model bivariate data represented on a scatter plot that minimizes residuals
b. Construct an exponential function to model bivariate data represented on a scatter plot that minimizes residuals
Interpret the slope (rate of change) and the y-intercept (constant term) of a linear model in the context of the data
Determine and interpret the correlation coefficient for a linear association
Distinguish between correlation and causation
DOMAIN  ARCHDIOCESAN EXPECTATIONS
Structure & Properties of Matter (MS PS1-4 moved to 5th gr) Develop models to describe the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on developing models of molecules that vary in complexity. Examples of simple molecules could include ammonia and methanol. Examples of extended structures could include sodium chloride or diamonds. Examples of molecular-level models could include drawings, 3D ball and stick structures, or computer representations showing different molecules with different types of atoms.
Gather, analyze, and present information to describe that synthetic materials come from natural resources and how they impact society. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on natural resources that undergo a chemical process to form the synthetic material. Examples of new materials could include new medicine, foods, and alternative fuels.] (*Should be taught through the elns of Catholicism. As Catholics, we believe that God wishes us to be good stewards of the Earth.)
Wave Properties Use mathematical representations to describe a simple model for waves that includes how the amplitude of a wave is related to the energy in a wave. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on describing waves with both qualitative and quantitative thinking.]
Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on both light and mechanical waves. Examples of models could include drawings, simulations, and written descriptions.]
Chemical Reactions Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred. [Clarification Statement: Examples of reactions could include burning sugar or steel wool, fat reacting with sodium hydroxide, and mixing zinc with hydrogen chloride.]
Develop and use a model to describe how the total number of atoms remains the same during a chemical reaction and thus mass is conserved. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on law of conservation of matter and on physical models or drawings, including digital forms that represent atoms.]
Construct, test, and modify a device that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the design, controlling the transfer of energy to the environment, and modification of a device using factors such as type and concentration of a substance. Examples of designs could involve chemical reactions such as dissolving ammonium chloride or calcium chloride.]
NGSS Forces & Interactions pg 38 (MO = Forces & Motion) Apply physics principles to design a solution that minimizes the force of an object during a collision and develop an evaluation of the solution.
Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on balanced (Newton’s First Law) and unbalanced forces in a system, qualitative comparisons of forces, mass and changes in motion (Newton’s Second Law), frame of reference, and specification of units.]
Analyze diagrams and collect data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces. [Clarification Statement: Examples of devices that use electric and magnetic forces could include electromagnets, electric motors, or generators. Examples of data could include the effect of the number of turns of wire on the strength of an electromagnet, or the effect of increasing the number or strength of magnets on the speed of an electric motor.]
Conduct an investigation and evaluate the experimental
design to provide evidence that electric and magnetic fields exist
between objects exerting forces on each other even though the objects
are not in contact. [Clarification Statement: Examples of this
phenomenon could include the interactions of magnets, electricallycharged strips of tape, and electrically-charged pith balls. Examples of investigations could include first-hand experiences or simulations.]
Construct and present arguments using evidence to support the claim that gravitational interactions are attractive and depend on the masses of interacting objects. [Clarification statement: Examples of evidence for arguments could include data generated from simulations or digital tools and charts displaying mass, strength of interaction, distance from the sun, and ornital periods of objects withingthe solar system) (assessment boundary: assessment does not include Newton’s Law of Gravitation or Kepler’s Laws.]
Conduct an investigation and evaluate the experimental
design to provide evidence that electric and magnetic fields exist
between objects exerting forces on each other even though the objects
are not in contact.. [Clarification Statement: Examples of this
phenomenon could include the interactions of magnets, electricallycharged strips of tape, and electrically-charged pith balls. Examples of investigations could include first-hand experiences or simulations.]
NGSS Energy pg 40 Construct and interpret graphical displays of data to describe the relationships of kinetic energy to the mass of an object and to the speed of an object. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on descriptive relationships between kinetic energy and mass separately from kinetic energy and speed. Examples could include riding a bicycle at different speeds, rolling different sizes of rocks downhill, and getting hit by a whiffle ball versus a tennis ball.]
Develop a model to describe that when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on relative amounts of potential energy, not on calculations of potential energy. Examples of objects within systems interacting at varying distances could include: the Earth and either a roller coaster cart at varying positions on a hill or objects at varying heights on shelves, changing the direction/orientation of a magnet, and a balloon with static electrical charge being brought closer to a classmate’s hair. Examples of models could include representations, diagrams, pictures, and written descriptions of systems.]
Apply scientific principles to design, construct, and test a device that either minimizes or maximizes thermal energy transfer. [Clarification Statement: Examples of devices could include an insulated box, a solar cooker, and a Styrofoam cup.]
Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the relationships among the energy transferred, the type of matter, the mass, and the change in the temperature of the sample. [Clarification Statement: Examples of experiments could include comparing final water temperatures after different masses of ice melted in the same volume of water with the same initial temperature, the temperature change of samples of different materials with the same mass as they cool or heat in the environment, or the same material with different masses when a specific amount of energy is added.]
Construct, use, and present arguments to support the claim that when the kinetic energy of an object changes, energy is transferred to or from the object. [Clarification Statement: Examples of empirical evidence used in arguments could include an inventory or other representation of the energy before and after the transfer in the form of temperature changes or motion of object.]
Engineering Design 6-8 (Must be taught throughout grades 6-8 units of study) Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions
Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem
Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success
Develop a model to generate data for iterative testing and modification of a proposed object, tool, or process such that an optimal design can be achieved
DOMAIN  ARCHDIOCESAN EXPECTATIONS
AMERICAN HISTORY
Black text = American History “Part 1” (beginning settlements through the Civil War). Red text = American History “Part 2” (post Civil War through Modern History)
Civics (Governmental Systems & Principles) Settlements
Compare the governmental systems of European powers to determine their effect on colonization in the Americas/Analyze the period of reconstruction to determine its effect on separation of powers, checks and balances, and the power of the central government
Explain how the founding of English colonies influenced their governments and expectations for self- rule/Evaluate the effectiveness of major legislation, Constitutional amendments, and court decisions relating to freed slaves
Analyze local and colonial governments to trace the factors influencing their structure and function/Analyze the expansion of political parties, interest groups and political machines to determine their effect on American government and policy
Founding
Evaluate the impact of the French and Indian Wars on Great Britain’s approach to colonial rule/Analyze how political developments and Constitutional Amendments of the period altered the relationship between government and its people
Apply the concept of representation to the conflict between the colonies and Great Britain
Apply the principles of inalienable rights, popular sovereignty, natural rights, and social contract to evaluate the purpose and legacy of the Declaration of Independence/Analyze the changing social norms and conflicting morals which emerged during the first three decades of the twentieth century
Evaluate the successes and challenges of the Articles of Confederation to explain the need for a Constitutional Convention
Apply the principles of rule of law, representation, separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism to explain the purposes and functions of the Constitution
Describe the origins and purposes of the Bill of Rights and evaluate the enduring significance of these concepts to the preservation of individual rights and liberties
Examine elections, issues, laws, and events of this time period to explain how the concepts of judicial review, elastic clause, and an amendment process were established or used to meet challenges
Expansion
Trace the expansion of voting rights and patterns and explain how it impacted elections and political movements/Analyze the relationships among the branches of government to explain conflicts and the changing power of each
Analyze landmark Supreme Court cases to determine the effect on the definition and expansion of federal power/Evaluate how the programs and policies of the New Deal and WWII changed the relationships among the government, groups, and individuals
Explain how the principles of rule of law, separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism were impacted by Jacksonian Democracy/Determine the lasting impact of the New Deal and WWII on principles of government, including separation of powers, checks and balances, judicial review, and limited government
Conflict & Crisis
Compare responses of government systems in the North and South to major legislation, executive orders, and court decisions before, during, and immediately after the Civil War/Analyze treaty agreements and international organizations to determine their impact on world challenges along with national and international order
Analyze federalism and popular sovereignty to explain peoples’ expectations of the role of government and their place in governance/Determine the lasting impact of shifting interpretations of governmental and constitutional principles including separation of powers, checks, and balances, rule of law, judicial review, and limited government
Analyze the election of 1860 to explain the development of political parties and how they influence the selection of leaders/Evaluate the extent to which Supreme Court cases and legislation served to expand equal rights during this era
Compare and contrast the governmental systems of the U.S. North and South to determine the strengths and weaknesses of federal and confederal systems/Analyze the motivations for and results of changing concepts of the federal government in post-Civil War America
Economics Tools of Social Science Inquiry
Using an American history lens, examine the opportunity costs and benefits of economic decisions on society as a whole as well as on individuals prior to c. 1870/Using a United States historical lens, analyze the opportunity costs and benefits of economic decisions on society as a whole as well as on individuals post c. 1870
Settlements
Compare sources of labor, emerging economic production, and availability of land in the New World and their impact on economic development in North and South America/Evaluate how the goals of Reconstruction impacted the economic recovery and growth of regions
Analyze the mercantile system to explain colonial responses to economic control by European nations, including Great Britain/Explain how the expansion of industrialization, transportation, and technological developments influenced different regions and the relationship between those regions
Founding
Describe the function and purpose of taxes imposed by Great Britain following the Seven Years War, evaluating colonial responses to them/Analyze emerging American involvement in world trade to determine its influence on foreign policy and government actions
Compare the emerging economic characteristics of the nation and colonial regions to make predictions about future expansion and conflict/Apply the economic concepts of natural resources, markets, supply and demand, labor, and capital to analyze the costs and benefits of imperialism
Trace the development of the American economic system to explain how taxes, tariffs, and monetary policies were used to establish sustainability and growth/Trace the changing relationship between government and business through economic regulation and deregulation
Expansion
Analyze the origins and characteristics of coercive labor systems, including slavery, and their impact on economic and political expansion/Apply the economic concepts of innovation, supply and demand, barriers to trade, labor, business cycle, credit, and wage gap to explain the causes of the Great Depression
Explain how the expansion of industrialization, transportation, and technological developments influenced different regions and the relationship among those regions/Describe the possible consequences, both intended and unintended, of government policies to improve economic conditions and increased productivity
Trace the continued development of the American economic system to explain how taxes, tariffs, and monetary policies were used to establish sustainability and growth
Conflict & Crisis
Explain how the expansion of industrialization, transportation, and technological developments influenced different regions and the relationship among those regions
Compare the economic strengths and weaknesses of the North and South before, during, and immediately after the Civil War/Compare the role of governments in various economic systems to explain competing world views
Geography Tools of Social Science Inquiry
Create and use maps and other graphic representations in order to explain relationships and reveal patterns or trends in American history prior to c.1870/Create and use maps and other graphic representations in order to explain relationships and reveal patterns or trends in United States history c. 1871-2010
Explain how the physical and human characteristics of regions in the Americas prior to c. 1870 are connected to changing identity and culture/Analyze how the physical and human characteristics of regions in the United States post c. 1870 are connected to changing identity and culture
Locate the following: major cities of Missouri, of the United States, and of the world; states of the United States and key world nations; the world’s continents and oceans; and major topographical features of the United States
Settlements
Analyze diverse Native American cultures in North, Central, and South America to explain the ways they adapted to their various environment/Evaluate the causes, patterns, and outcomes of internal migrations and urbanizations
Analyze the geography of colonial regions to explain their cultural, social, and economic differences/Evaluate the effects of Westward expansion on the production, distribution, and allocation of resources and on the environment
Compare major patterns of population distribution, demographics, and migrations in the United States and the impact of those patterns on cultures and community life
Founding
Draw conclusions about regional conflict and cooperation as a consequence of physical geography/Describe how the expansion of transportation and technological developments influenced acquisition of new territories
Evaluate the relationships among population, representation, and their effect on power in the new government
Compare major patterns of population distribution, demographics, and migrations in the United States during this era c. 1763-1812
Expansion
*Trace the changing boundaries of the United States and describe how it represents the changing relationships with its neighbors and Native Americans (*Should be taught through the lens of Catholicism)/Describe the consequences, both intended and unintended, of environmental decisions through the lens of Catholic Social Teaching
*Assess Manifest Destiny in relation to push-pull factors, geographic features, and human environmental interactions to determine their influence on the movement of goods, people, and ideas (*Should be taught through the lens of Catholicism)/Analyze the impact of geography in the European and Pacific threats during WWII to compare war efforts and strategies
Compare major patterns of population distribution, demographics, and migrations in the United States and the impact of those patterns on cultures and community life c.1812-1848
Conflict & Crisis
Analyze the United States geography of North, South, and West in order to explain regional, cultural, social, and economic differences/Evaluate the causes and consequences of demographic shifts and internal migrations
Evaluate the significance of geography on the conduct of the war and strategy of the North and South/Explain how the physical and human characteristics of places determined their influence on or importance to Cold War events
Compare major patterns of population distribution, demographics, and migrations in the United States and the impact of those patterns on cultures and community life
History
(Continuity & Change)
Tools of Social Science Inquiry
Create and use tools to analyze a chronological sequence of related events in American history/Analyze physical geography to understand the availability and movement of resources in this era
Explain connections between historical context and peoples’ perspectives at the time in American history/Evaluate the relationship between technological and scientific advancements and increasing global interaction in this era
With assistance, develop a research plan, identify appropriate resources for investigating social studies topics, and create a research product which applies an aspect of American history prior to c. 1870 to a contemporary issue
Using an inquiry lens, develop compelling questions about American history prior to c. 1870, to determine helpful resources and consider multiple viewpoints represented in the resources
Analyze the causes and consequences of a specific problem in American history prior to c. 1870 as well as the challenges and opportunities faced by those trying to address the problem
Settlements
Trace the causes and consequences of indigenous peoples arriving in the Americas beginning c. 15,000 BCE/Compare and contrast the plans for and results of political reintegration of Southern states after the Civil War
Compare factors motivating Europeans to explore and settle in the New World to explain colonial diversity and regional differences in North and South America/Describe the purpose, challenges, and economic incentives that impacted expansion and Westward movement
Trace the causes and consequences of conflict and cooperation between Native Americans and North and South American colonists using multiple viewpoints/Trace the contributions of individuals and institutions on social, political, artistic, and economic development
Describe the causes and consequences of the Seven Years War as a turning point in American history
Analyze the concept of Manifest Destiny as a catalyst for change in American history
Founding
Trace the events leading to escalating conflict between Great Britain and the colonies from multiple viewpoints/Describe the causes and consequences of United States Imperialism at home and abroad
Analyze the Declaration of Independence to determine the historical context and political philosophies that influenced its creation/Evaluate the motivations for the United States’ entry into WWI
Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the American colonies and Great Britain to explain the American victory in the Revolution/Evaluate the impact of U.S. participation in WWI and the resulting peace efforts
Explain the major debates that occurred during the adoption of the Constitution and their ultimate resolution/Evaluate the responses of United States’ leaders to the challenges of the period
Evaluate the responses of early American leaders to the social, political, economic, and religious challenges facing the new nation
Infer how events of this period led to the development of philosophies, interest groups, and political parties
Expansion
Analyze the expansion of the United States in the early nineteenth century to trace U.S. growth and form hypotheses about future conflicts/Trace the significant events and developments of the Great Depression and WWII
Evaluate the responses of North and South American leaders to the social, political, economic, and religious challenges of the period/Evaluate the responses of United States’ leaders to the challenges of the Great Depression and World War II
Analyze the forced removal and resettlements of Native Americans to determine its impact on their cultures and civilizations (*Should be taught through the lens of Catholicism)/Describe critical developments and turning points in WWII including major battles
Conflict & Crisis
Analyze political compromises over slavery in the territories to explain intensifying sectional conflicts/Describe the causes and major conflicts, consequences, and enduring legacy of the Cold War
Trace the events as well as political, cultural, economic, and social conditions leading to conflict between Northern and Southern states/Evaluate the responses of United States’ leaders to the challenges of global tensions
Describe critical developments and turning points in the Civil War, including major battles/Trace changes in military strategies and technologies as a response to the challenges of the Cold War
People, Groups, & Cultures Tools of Social Science Inquiry
Using an American history lens, describe how peoples’ perspectives shaped the sources/artifacts they created
Using an American history lens, examine the origins and impact of social structures and stratification on societies and relationships between peoples/Using a United States historical lens, examine the origins and impact of social structures and stratification on societies and relationships between peoples
Settlements
*Analyze the religious, cultural, political, and intellectual developments of Spanish, Portuguese, British, and French regions to explain the development of diverse cultures throughout the Americas (*Should be taught through the lens of Catholicism)
*Analyze the religious, cultural, and intellectual developments of the European colonies to explain the development of regionalism and an American identity (*Should be taught through the lens of Catholicism)
*Compare and contrast the interaction of European settlers with Native Americans in both North and South America (*Should be taught through the lens of Catholicism)
Founding
Analyze the perspectives of diverse individuals and groups to explain the extent of their support for the Revolutionary War
Analyze populations of colonies/states to explain how their cultural, religious, social, and economic characteristics influenced the emergence of regional identity
Compare and contrast the perspectives of individuals and groups regarding the development of the American governmental system to explain emerging divisions and political philosophies
Evaluate laws, events, and perspectives to determine the extent to which individuals and groups could participate in, and realize, the promise of American ideals
Analyze the artistic and intellectual achievements of early Americans to provide evidence of an emerging American identity
Expansion
Evaluate the effectiveness of various reform movements, laws, and events to determine their impact on the promise of American ideals
Analyze the experiences of enslaved peoples in North and South America to determine their cultural impact and consequences (*Should be taught through the lens of Catholicism)
Analyze artistic, intellectual, and religious movements to show how they reflect the aspirations and beliefs of the developing nation (*Should be taught through the lens of Catholicism)
Describe the culture and accomplishments of Native American cultures to compare the various ways they responded to American expansion/Analyze the impact of the Great Depression and World War II on the arts and culture
Analyze patterns of immigration to determine their impacts on the cultural, social, political, and economic development
Conflict & Crisis
Determine the impact of the ideas contained in major speeches, literature, music, and writings from diverse individuals on the perspectives of American people, groups, and movements/Evaluate the effect of the internal tensions caused by the Cold War on societal groups, organizations, and government
Describe the impact of scientific and technological advances on the outcome of the war and its effect on people and diverse groups/Analyze the scientific, technological, artistic, intellectual, economic, political, and cultural changes of the post-WWII
Analyze the evolution of the women’s movement to trace its continued development and evaluate its impact/Evaluate social reforms to determine their impact on the ability of individuals and groups to realize the promise of American ideals
Analyze the evolution of the Abolitionist Movement to trace its continued development and evaluate its impact/Analyze push-pull factors to explain changing immigration patterns and their continuing effects on the United States
Trace the development of African American culture in non-slave states and in the context of slavery/Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of citizens and institutions to address and solve United States’ problems c. post 1870
DOMAIN  ARCHDIOCESAN EXPECTATIONS
Computing Systems Evaluate the design of computing devices, based on the characteristics of each device and how users interact with it, to improve the overall user experience
Design projects that combine hardware and software to collect and exchange data
Develop a systematic troubleshooting routine to identify the problem, research solutions, and fix problems with computing devices, components, and software
Networks & Internet Model the different ways that data is transferred across a network and the protocols used to transmit the data
Recognize and determine computer threats and be able to identify programs and methods to protect electronic information
Demonstrate how data is transmitted through multiple methods of encryption
Data & Analysis Represent data using multiple encoding schemes
Collect data using computational tools and display it for the end user in an easy to understand way
Algorithms & Programming Analyze methods to refine computational models based on received data
Design algorithms with flow charts and/or pseudocode to show solutions to complex problems
Create clearly named variables to store and manipulate information
Design and develop combinations of control structures, nested loops, and compound conditionals
Decompose problems and sub problems into parts to facilitate the design, implementation, and review of programs
Create procedures with parameters to organize code and make it easier to reuse
Use feedback from team members and users to refine solutions to meet user needs
Use flowcharts and/or pseudocode to solve problems using algorithms
Test and refine programs using a range of test cases
Manage project tasks and timelines when collaboratively developing computational artifacts
Digital Citizenship Compare tradeoffs associated with computing technologies that have impacted people’s activities, careers, and lives when solving global problems using the power of computing
Give proper attribution to code, media, etc. that are used in projects
Discuss issues of bias and accessibility in the design of existing technologies
Collaborate through strategies such as crowdsourcing or surveys when creating a computational artifact
Describe tradeoffs between allowing information to be public and keeping information private and secure
Innovative designer Know and use a deliberate design process for generating ideas, testing theories, creating innovative artifacts, or solving authentic problems
Select and use digital tools to plan and manage a design process that considers design constraints and calculated risk
Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process
DOMAIN  ARCHDIOCESAN EXPECTATIONS
Create Document early stages of the creative process visually and/or verbally in traditional or new media
Collaboratively shape an artisitic investigation of an aspect of present-day life using a contemporary practice of art or design
Demonstrate willingness to experiment, innovate, and take risks to pursue ideas, forms, and meanings that emerge in the process of art-making or designing
Demonstrate awareness of practices, issues, and ethics of appropriation, fair use, copyright, open source, and creative commons as they apply to creating works of art and design
Select, organize, and design images and words to make visually clear and compelling presentations
Apply relevant criteria to examine, reflect on, and plan revisions for a work of art or design in progress
Present Develop and apply criteria for evaluating a collection of artwork for presentation
Collaboratively prepare and present selected theme-based artwork for display, and formulate exhibition narratives for the viewer
Analyze why and how an exhibition or collection may influence ideas, beliefs, and experiences
Respond Explain how a person’s aesthetic choices are influenced by culture and environment and impact the visual image that one conveys to others
Compare and contrast contexts and media in which viewers encounter images that influence ideas, emotions, and actions
Interpret art by analyzing how the interaction of subject matter, characteristics of form and structure, use of media, artmaking approaches, and relevant contextual information all contribute to understanding messages, ideas, and/or mood conveyed
Create a convincing and logical argument to support an evaluation of art
Connect Make art collaboratively to reflect on and reinforce positive aspects of group identity
Distinguish different ways art is used to represent, establish, reinforce, and reflect group identity
DOMAIN  ARCHDIOCESAN EXPECTATIONS
Create Generate rythmic, melodic, and harmonic phrases and harmonic accompaniements within expanded forms (including introductions, transitions, and codas) that convey expressive intent
Select, organize, and document personal musical ideas for arrangements, songs, and compositions within expanded forms that demonstrate tension and release, unity and variety, balance, and that convey expressive intent
Use standard notation and/or audio/ video recording to document personal rhythmic phrases, melodic phrases, and harmonic sequences
Evaluate one’s own work by selecting and applying criteria including appropriate application of compositional techniques, style, form and use of sound sources
Describe the rationale for refining work by explaining the choices, based on evaluation criteria
Present the final version of one’s documented personal composition, song or arrangement, using craftmanhsip and originality to demonstrate the application of compositional techniques for creating unity and variety, tension, and release and balance to convey expressive intent
Perform Explain how understanding the structure and the elements of music are used inmusic selected for performance
When analyzing selected music, sightread in treble or bass clef simple rythmic, melodic, and/or harmonic notation
Identify how cultural and historical context inform performances and result in different musical effects
Perform contrasting pieces of music demonstrating, as well as explaining, how the music’s intent is conveyed by interpretations of the elements of music and expressive qualities (such as dynamics, tempo, timbre, anticulation/style and phrasing)
Identify and apply personally developed criteria (such as demonstrating correct interpretation of notation, techical skill of performer, originality, emotional impact, variety, and interest) and determine when the music is ready to perform
Perform music with technical accuracy, stylistic expression, and culturally authenic practices in music to convey the creator’s intent
Demonstrate performance decorum (such as stage presence, attire, and behavior) and audience etiquette apprporiate for venue, purpose, context, and style
Respond Select programs of music (such as a CD mix or live performances) and demonstrate the connections to an interest or experience for a specific purpose
Demonstrate and explain, citing evidence, how responses to music are informed by the structure, the use of the elements of music, and context (such and social and cultureal)
Identify and compare the context of programs of music from a variety of genres, cultures, and historical periods
Support personal interpretation of contrasting programs of music and explain how creators’ or perfromers’ apply the elements of music and expressive qualties, within genres, cultures, and historical periods to convey expressive intent
Apply appropriate personally developed criteria to evaluate musical works or performances
Connect Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding to music
Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life
DOMAIN  ARCHDIOCESAN EXPECTATIONS
Movement & Manipulative Skills Analyze selected skills and identify strategies to improve skill technique
Demonstrate an increased level of competence in skill techniques, scoring, and safety practices in a variety of individual, dual, and team sports
Strategy & Applying Skills Analyze play of one’s opponent and apply effective defensive and offensive techniques
Analyze the creative and aesthetic aspects of a dance pattern (e.g., direction, time, flow, level, energy)
Analyze differences and similarities in dances from various cultures
Health & Fitness Apply knowledge of basic first aid for the treatment of injury inside and outside the physical activity setting (e.g., Asthma, CPR, RICE – Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation)
Use the concepts of health-related and skill-related fitness to connect the benefits each offers to the development of total fitness
Describe the cause/effect of nutrition and exercise in maintaining a healthy weight (calories in = calories out)
Compare/contrast characteristics of healthy versus unhealthy personal/social relationships and analyze their effects on one’s health
Identify and demonstrate a variety of specific activities designed to reduce and manage stress (e.g., aerobics, Pilates, deep breathing, muscle relaxation)
Identify exercise principles of overload, progression, and specificity and how they relate to exercise
Compare/contrast physical effects from a sedentary versus active lifestyle on the body’s curculary, respiratory, muscular, and skeletal systems
Attitude & Behavior Demonstrate the ability to solve problems by analyzing causes and potential solutions in a physical activity setting (e.g., checklist of conflict resolution skills)
Exhibit responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others
DOMAIN  ARCHDIOCESAN EXPECTATIONS
Novice-High: With little to no teacher support, student can independently and consistently…
Communication Engage in conversations, provide and obtain information in the target language
Recite the Sign of the Cross, Hail Mary, Our Father, and Glory Be from memory
Use courtesies, greetings, and salutations in appropriate situations written and orally
Ask and respond to basic questions using interrogative words and vocabulary written and orally
Say alphabet letter names and their sounds in random order (not consecutive order)
Engage in basic conversations in the target language
Produce target vocabulary with accuracy written and orally
Write simple paragraphs in the target language on various topics using targeted vocaulary and grammar concepts
Comprehension Understand written and spoken text in the target language on a variety of topics
Recognize familiar words, phrases, and questions written and spoken with visual/contextual support and by applying prior knowledge
Comprehend age and level-appropriate reading passages in target language with visual/contextual support and by applying prior knowledge
Respond to classroom commands and questions given in the target language
Listen to native speech of the target language and discuss topics, words, and sounds from the spoken text
Vocabulary Acquisition Demonstrate understanding of target vocabulary by using words and phrases correctly during class discussions, conversations, and sentence formation
Vocabulary Topics:
calendar
cardinal numbers 0-1 million
ordinal numbers first-tenth
time (chronology and time-referenced vocabulary; i.e. later, going to do something, in the morning)
sports and leisure activities
food (and how to order a meal in a restaurant)
singular and plural possessive adjectives and agreement
family
body
descriptive adjectives
shopping and clothing
modes of transportation
prepositions of place (i.e. in back of, underneath)
common idiomatic expressions and phrases using irregular verbs (i.e. “tener que” phrases in Spanish)
common prefixes and sufixes
common infinitives
Geography & Culture Demonstrate understanding of different cultures by learning about traditions, perspectives, and daily life in countries where the target language is spoken
Identify location of all countries/continents where target language is spoken on a map
Explain major traditional holidays and/or events celebrated in countries where the target language is spoken
Compare/contrast aspects of traditions, perspectives, and daily life in countries where the target language is spoken with one’s own traditions, perspectives, and daily life
Compare/contrast similarities and differences of target language with one’s own native language
Grammar Concepts Demonstrate knowledge of conventions of standard grammar of the target language when writing and speaking
Apply rule of gender and number agreement with nouns, adjectives, and definite/indefinite articles
Apply basic rules of word order (adjectives comes after nouns in Spanish)
Use all subject pronouns in the target language
Conjugate regular verbs in the present tense (regular AR,ER,IR verbs in Spanish) and use them in writing and speech
Conjugate regular verbs in the present progressive tense
Conjugate the verb “to be” and use in writing and speech
Conjugate the simple/informal future tense (“Ir + a + infinitive” in Spanish) to express what one is “going to do”
Conjugate common irregular verbs in the present tense
Conjugate the verb “to like” in singular and plural forms to express likes and dislikes